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Super Bowl Ads for 2009


Glint Adv - December 4, 2008 - 0 comments

Super Bowl regulars like FedEx Corp., Garmin Ltd., Salesgenie.com and General Motors Corp. are sitting out this year’s football championship, to be held Feb. 1 in Tampa, Fla. But NBC says it is negotiating with other potential advertisers for the eight 30-second advertising spots that remain open.

NBC had a total of around 67 spots for Super Bowl XLIII and has sold about 59, or 88 percent. In September, NBC said 85 percent of the 30-second spots had sold for about $3 million each.

The National Football League championship is considered the premier advertising event of the year, and it often heralds new trends in advertising sales and styles.

Many traditional Super Bowl sponsors are staying on, including prepackaged goods and beverage companies and nearly every major movie studio.

At least one sponsor is returning after an extended absence: Monster Worldwide Inc., whose last Super Bowl appearance was in 2004.

Anheuser-Busch Cos. Ltd. is one company that’s going to keep advertising. It bought 10 30-second spots, some of which will be combined to run as 60-second spots.

One ad features a Clydesdale who immigrates from Scotland. The horse tries its hand — or hoof — at different jobs ranging from racehorse to buggy puller with limited success, until it finds its true calling.

The spot’s elaborate set included a turn-of-the-century New York streetscape with dozens of extras, overseen by top-shelf ad director Joe Pytka. The crew also shot on location in Scotland, demonstrating the extent to which Anheuser-Busch will go for its Super Bowl ads.

Budweiser ads in Super Bowls date back to 1975 when a hotrodding skier revealed she was a Bud girl. The self-proclaimed King of Beers has reigned over the alcoholic beverage segment at the Super Bowl since securing exclusive rights in the category in a 1989 deal set to last through 2012.

Provided by Associated Press, edited by Glint Advertising & Design.

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