Tag Archives: Advertising

Glint Advertising Welcomes Two New Glinsters

Farmers Branch, TX: Today, Glint Advertising announced the addition of two new employees to its roster of talented advertisers and marketers. Jordan Jones comes from Williams-Sonoma, and possesses a degree in graphic design, and Meredith Redfern joins Glint as a summer intern as she finishes her senior year at the University of North Texas with a major in advertising and minor in psychology. Said Craig Lloyd, President of Glint Advertising of the new additions, “We are very pleased to add these two very talented ladies to our Glint team. Between Jordan’s energy and eye for innovative designs, and Meredith’s educational background and passion for client satisfaction, we will continue our mission of providing unique branding insight, bold designs and diversified perspectives.”

Jordan Jones comes to Glint from Williams-Sonoma in Oklahoma where she was a Designer. Jordan has a bachelor in Graphic Design from Southern Nazarene University and is inspired by photography and modern/industrial design. Jordan is a big sports enthusiast, and will be an Olympic Skier or X-Gamer in her next life.

Meredith Redfern will be completing a summer internship, and is a senior at University of North Texas. Meredith has expressed her creativity since she was quite young, and has been providing client satisfaction at her parent’s retail business since she was a teenager. She is our own rock star, having attended over 50 concerts and counting.

About Glint Advertising: Glint Advertising was founded in 2000 and provides branding, advertising and marketing services to a diverse client base throughout North Texas and beyond from its two DFW locations. Glint is a full-service advertising agency specializing in branding and integrated marketing campaigns, with a focus on strategy and collaboration. Glint has received numerous awards for its creative work. For more information visit: glintadv.com.

Did You Catch That?

Netflix, Hulu, other streaming services, and at home recording devices are making commercials easier to avoid. As traditional commercials lose effectiveness, advertisers are having a harder time reaching consumers. As a result, advertisers are relying on product placement within TV shows and movies as an increasingly important part of the promotional mix. Some product placements work very well as the brand or product is seamlessly integrated into the storyline, while other placements are disruptive and look like a commercial within the show.

Opinions vary when it comes to how people feel about seeing products placed in their favorite TV show or movie. Jonkoping University found the majority of people are neutral or indifferent, often overlooking products that are placed on the counter or in the background. Those who are indifferent or neutral are so immersed in the storyline that while they may see the product they don’t think about the purpose of it being on the screen.

Some have a positive perception of product placements as it highlights the brand in a lifelike setting and shows the usability of the product. These consumers like the product being incorporated into the storyline because it serves a purpose for both the characters and the brand. On the opposite side of the spectrum, some people feel they are being manipulated and deceived if a product is incorporated into a storyline. They are watching shows and movies for entertainment and don’t want to see a commercial in the middle of a plot.

Product placements have different roles and uses in a show or movie. Often they are intertwined within a storyline as a plot element making the viewer aware of the product but not overselling it. Conversely, product placements sometimes steal focus away from the plot and effectively act as a commercial in the middle of the storyline. While integrated placements are rarely viewed negatively, the disruptive “mini-commercial” often generates viewer ire. Either way, product placements are gaining popularity, becoming more predominate, driving sales and are used for both creative purposes and to help fund TV shows and movies.

Product placement deals can bring in millions of dollars to TV shows and movies. Subway played a huge role in the show Chuck. When Chuck was on the verge of being canceled, Subway came in and paid an undisclosed sum of money to have their sandwiches featured in the show, along with the then-current promotion. With this product placement deal, Subway essentially funded Chuck for a few more seasons.

Although Subway funded Chuck and kept it on the air longer than it otherwise would have run, the product placements were sometimes cheesy and dominated the storyline. It became a running joke to see how Subway was going to be incorporated within the episode each week. Along with Subway placements, Toyota also placed their brand in the show. However, the Toyota placement fell in the “mini-commercial” side of the product placement spectrum, with a 40-second segment about the new Sienna Mini-Van, and greatly distracted from the story line.

Unfortunately, bad product placements have generated a lot of backlash and placed a shadow over the tactic in total. Many shows have unsuccessfully tried to integrate placement deals into their shows. Here are a few examples that had people talking about the placements more than the storylines.

Hawaii Five-0 has been roundly criticized for their heavy use of product placements, often having their episodes accused of being one giant commercial break. The show uses several brands such as Chevrolet, Microsoft, Subway, Bing, and others to generate the money necessary to stay on the air. Despite the criticism, these brands have found success after promoting products during the show.

• One episode of New Girl was centered on the legendary Prince and how he was hosting a party that Jess was attending. Instead of the show gaining positive press with the presence of Prince, the episode was generally panned due to the bad Ford Fusion product placement and the poor acting around it.

The Biggest Loser is also guilty of having cringe-worthy product placements. During one episode the Ziplock name is mentioned four times in a one-minute clip, including specifications about how much the containers can hold, and all the wonders they can do for a diet.

Clean & Clear had one of the worst product placement segments in The Secret Life of the American Teenager. The actors directly quote familiar lines from commercials, yet try to pass it off as everyday conversation. This clip looks more like an infomercial than a segment of a TV show.

However, not all product placements are negative. Some shows have been able to incorporate brands seamlessly into an episode, and even have the viewers enjoy it.

The Big Bang Theory takes a subtle, but effective approach to product placements. In one episode, Sheldon is promoting two separate brands within one scene. The first is Purell and the second is Staples. Sheldon mentions both Purell and Staples unobtrusively without impacting the flow of the scene. In a different episode, The Big Bang Theory promoted Apple’s newest feature at the time, Siri.

Friends had several product placements deals during its run, but one of the most successful episodes they had featured Pottery Barn. Within one scene they were able to mention the brand six times and center part of the episode’s storyline around it. After this episode had aired, the brand’s phone lines didn’t stop ringing for catalog requests.

• Ford subtly placed one of their newest trucks in an episode of Nashville. The fifteen- second spot didn’t mention anything about the truck but was able to show off some of the features that the tailgate offers.

Product placements typically work out well for brands. Yes, there are some instances where there is more backlash than praise, but people are still talking about the brand. Product placements in movies have worked the best and brands quickly see an increase in sales.

• Reese’s Pieces played a key role in E.T. and Hershey’s profits went up by 65% after the movie was released.

• Ray-Ban’s now classic Wayfarer sunglasses was saved by Risky Business selling 360,000 pairs the year of the film’s release and Aviator sales increased by 40% three years later after Top Gun was released.

• The Mini Cooper was claimed to be the star of The Italian Job and caused a 22% increase in sales the year the movie was released.

Just like brands, films also make money off of product placements. 2013’s Man of Steel raked in over $160 million worth of product placement deals from over 100 brands worldwide.

Brands spend millions of dollars a year for product placements. Viewers are more likely to take notice and want a product if it is in one of their favorite TV shows or movies. Every once in a while though, brands don’t pay for placements and their products are used strictly for creative purposes.

One episode in season six of Modern Family is filmed entirely on iPads and iPhones and then captured on a character’s MacBook. The MacBook featured the use of Facebook, Facetime, iMessage, iCloud, iPhoto, Google, Yahoo, ABC News and more. Even though the episode featured many Apple products and applications, Apple did not pay a cent for the placement as co-creator, Steve Levitan, came up with the plot from real life experience.

With the rise of DVRs, Netflix, Hulu and other content outlets that let you skip commercials, brands are becoming more innovative when it comes to getting products in front of viewers. By placing their products in TV shows and movies, advertisers are augmenting their traditional advertising and media plans.

Where do you land on product placements? Do product placements play a big role in how you feel about watching TV or movies? How do you feel about product placements that are completely organic and not paid?

If you have questions about branding and how your business can build and sustain a true competitive advantage, reach out to Glint at www.glintadv.com or give us a call at 817-616-0320. From large scale real estate developments, to hospitals, retail stores and credit unions, Glint has been helping clients define, refine and hone their brand strategy and imagery for over 16 years.

Glint Advertising Helps Prestige Credit Union Celebrate 80 Years

Farmers Branch, TX: Prestige Community Credit Union is celebrating 80 years of serving its members with a big celebration on June 17, 2016. Prestige has proudly served the Dallas area since 1936, and will celebrate their anniversary with members and the general public by serving cake and handing out prizes during the daylong celebration. Ron Knight, Vice President of Marketing, said, “We’re very excited to celebrate this milestone event with both our members and the community at large. It’s been a great 80 years, and we look forward to serving the greater Dallas area for 80 more.”

In support of the 80th celebration, Prestige’s agency of record Glint Advertising has created a social media content strategy and campaign to raise awareness and generate excitement, including a fun game of hide and seek for Preston the Pig, Prestige’s mascot, on the company’s website. Said Todd Miller, Business Director at Glint, “Glint is thrilled to provide marketing and branding support to a strong, tenured and successful business such as Prestige. 80 years serving the greater Dallas area is a powerful testament to the passion and care Prestige puts into its members every day.”

In addition to the prizes being given away at the celebration event on June 17, anyone who can find Preston the Pig on the Prestige website between June 9 and June 25, 2016, can enter for a chance to win one of three $80 prizes and their own stuffed Preston. Ron Knight added, “Our members love Preston, and he’s become such an iconic piece of Prestige. We are very excited the way Glint has incorporated Preston into our campaigns, especially our 80th celebration. And, I can tell you, Preston is thrilled for his part in giving away over $240 in prizes.”

About Prestige Credit Union: Prestige Community Credit Union was founded in 1936 in Dallas, Texas as Sun Employees Credit Union. Today, Prestige provides credit, lending and banking services to over 7,000 members nationwide. Prestige Community Credit Union is located at 15203 Knoll Trail Suite 101, Dallas, TX 75248, and has assets of $82 million. For more information visit: prestigecu.org/.

About Glint Advertising: Glint Advertising was founded in 2000 and provides branding, advertising and marketing services to a diverse client base throughout North Texas and beyond from its two DFW locations. Glint is a full-service advertising agency specializing in branding and integrated marketing campaigns, with a focus on strategy and collaboration. Glint has received numerous awards for its creative work. For more information visit: glintadv.com.

Glint Advertising Celebrates Spring by Opening Bay Door

Farmers Branch, TX: Out comes the sun and up goes the rolling door of windows in the new industrial style office space bringing in the fresh air that gives the feel of a Deep Ellum or SoHo loft. The bay door brings a new element to the office that is stimulating and productive. Todd Miller, Director of Business said, “Our virtual porch has quickly become a client favorite. The open air and sounds of outdoor activity brings a fresh perspective to creative brainstorming that’s truly unique to Glint.”

Glint has been hard at work creating a workspace that enhances creativity and maximizes the capability of its human capital. By working closely with Ideas Group in a shared building, Glint has a unique atmosphere that shies away from the typical high-rise office space. After a recent visit one client noted, “you could feel the energy in the building, it was both fun and productive in that environment.”

Along with the new office space, Glint Advertising has incorporated the “blue vase” culture of persistence for its clients. Craig Lloyd, President and CEO commented, “We have always been very proud of the work we do for our clients, but the new office space and “blue vase” culture has encouraged free-flowing ideas and creativity, taking brand inspiration to new levels.”

About Glint Advertising: Glint Advertising was founded in 2000 and provides branding, advertising and marketing services to a diverse client base throughout North Texas and beyond from its two DFW locations. Glint is a full-service advertising agency specializing in branding and integrated marketing campaigns, with a focus on strategy and collaboration. Glint has received numerous awards for its creative work. For more information visit: glintadv.com.

Sex In Advertising

Sex sells. So they say. Sex has been a part of the advertising landscape for a long time, but in recent years, sex has become even more prominent in the world of advertising. From fashion brands to food to celebrities, many advertisers are pushing the bounds of sexuality in their marketing.

Calvin Klein released their newest racy campaign, featuring several models and actresses posing in photos that have raised controversy. In this campaign, the brand is incorporating the nude selfie generation and the accessibility to Snapchat. In previous years, they have integrated Tinder and playing on Millennial’s comfort and familiarity of sex in their lives.

The current campaign features photos up the dress of a model, another with her hands in her underwear, amongst others. Calvin Klein also released an image of jeans put on backward with the word “belfie”, tapping into slang from the urban dictionary.

The photos for the 2016 campaign can be found on their Instagram page with comments that bash the pictures and designer. However, even with the controversy, sales have been strong. Within the last year, revenue has increased by 20%. The sexual pictures are working for the brand, and have been since the 1980s, regardless of the controversy they generate.

Why does Calvin Klein find success in these sexually charged campaigns? The brand finds success because people talk. Sex may not necessarily translate directly into dollars, but it does translate into conversations and a sexy brand image.

Does this mean that only sexualized campaigns increase revenue for a fashion company? At the opposite end of the spectrum, Ralph Lauren has crafted a brand image that is classy and polished. Their advertising campaigns typically feature models fully covered, in upscale and empowering situations. Ralph Lauren has carved a different path for its brand and products, and they have found success with their approach.

Ralph Lauren’s profits have increased by 4% this past year, and they are exceeding expectations for financial performance.

Fashion may be one of the most obvious, but it is not the only industry to use sex in their advertisements. In 2009, Burger King released a campaign featuring their new 7-inch burger. The image they used showed a woman with her mouth open and the headline “It’ll blow your mind away.”

Burger King is not the only fast food chain to use sex in their advertising. Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s use models in bikinis to sexualize their advertisements to bring in their target market of young, hungry guys. Both fast food chains have found success with their sexual message. Brad Haley, the Chief Marketing Officer, says that the ads bring in hundreds of millions of dollars in free publicity.

Other fast food chains such as McDonald’s and Wendy’s use family-friendly advertising and successfully compete with Burger King and Carl’s Jr. In fact, McDonald’s has seen an increase in revenue using traditional messaging with a new product introduction, all day breakfast, to boost sales.

Celebrities and musicians provide another example of how some have built strong brands and followings through sex, while others have chosen alternate routes. Artists such as Miley Cyrus and Madonna have been criticized for producing shows and appearances that are very sexual in nature and wearing racy outfits. When Miley Cyrus performed at the MTV Video Music Awards, social media was flooded about her dress and her actions, and she was talked about for weeks. After her performance, sales for her album and radio airplay increased substantially.

Madonna faced similar ridicule in the 1980s for her song “Like a Virgin.” There was a public outcry about the lyrics and meaning of the song. Madonna pushed the limits with her performances, songs and especially her music videos creating significant publicity in the media. Both Miley and Madonna reaped large rewards for their brand and their music after using a sexualized stunt or imagery.

Conversely, artists such as Taylor Swift and Adele have also enjoyed immense success without selling themselves sexually. In the November 2015 issue of Forbes, Taylor Swift was named the second highest-paid female artist. She has endorsements with Keds, Diet Coke and Apple Music, most of which would not have been possible if she had sexualized herself.

Likewise, Adele has carved a very successful path for her brand and music, and was named the ninth highest paid musician on Billboard’s Top Money-Maker list. Her typical stage outfit is all black and she is completely covered standing in front of a microphone. She does not do any provocative movements or make sexual innuendos in her music, and she has still found success.

Sex in advertising is a very controversial subject. How much, how far and how bold are questions brands have debated for decades. Brands such as Calvin Klein, Burger King, Hardee’s and Miley Cyrus take more risks in their advertising and marketing, and do so with good success. Ralph Lauren, McDonald’s and Taylor Swift have carved out very different brand imagery, and do not rely on sex and sexual innuendo to advertise and market their products, and also generate business success.

A good marketing and advertising program understands the target market, speaks to consumer needs and creates a sustainable and competitive brand positioning. What works for one brand may not work for another, and in fact, could be very detrimental. (Could you imagine Disney using Calvin Klein’s approach to advertising and marketing their amusement parks?)

Where do you stand on sex in advertising? Do the ends justify the means? If your brand could double sales tomorrow by using sexualized ads, would you? Or, does your brand image require a different approach? Do you know why?

If you have questions about branding and how your business can build and sustain a true competitive advantage, reach out to Glint at www.glintadv.com or give us a call at 817-616-0320. From large scale real estate developments, to hospitals, retail stores and credit unions, Glint has been helping clients define, refine and hone their brand strategy and imagery for over 16 years.