Tag Archives: YouTube

Marketing Director’s Guide to social video in 2020

Man taking promo videoIn statistical terms, many marketing experts see video marketing as their “holy grail.” Here are a few notable numbers about the medium:

  • 85% of all online users watch video content monthly on any of their given devices.
  • 54% of all consumers want to see more content out of the different brands/companies that they support.
  • Videos are the favorite type of content people want to see on social media.
  • 88% of all video marketers find themselves satisfied with the ROI their video marketing efforts provide.

If video seems so overly loved and preferred among audiences, why haven’t we reached a point of oversaturation? There are a few reasons for this; for one, a lot of the statistics we talk about refer to quality video content. Half-hearted forays into the format aren’t going to give you the results you want. Secondly, it’s important to realize that not all video content goes to the same place. There are a variety of different video social platforms out there, all of which have different pros, cons, and uses from a marketing perspective. Here’s a look at the major video social platforms out there and some of the existing video marketing strategies for each.

Snapchat

While Snapchat is one of the hottest video social platforms, it’s also one of the most unique, as the advent of similar functionalities for Instagram and now Twitter show. In essence, Snapchat is used for posting small images/videos known as “stories” that are deleted after 24 hours. In and of itself, this feature instantly separates Snapchat from the other options on the market. However, what should you know about finding success on this platform?

For one thing, as you probably already assumed, having your content get deleted after a day means that you need to be smart with how you prepare video content. Creating a longer video then cutting it into snap-friendly snippets will be a lot better use of your time than creating a bunch of smaller ones. You also want to be creative with your image editing to add your own brand flair to more generic images/videos. Demographics also matter. There’s no denying that Snapchat is the domain of millennials and younger generations. Trying to target Snapchat toward, say, a senior living facility is pretty much a waste of time and assets.

How Are Companies Using Snapchat? A great example of using Snapchat’s features and demographics to a marketing advantage is the Sour Patch Kids campaign in 2014. The brand, targeting teen fans of the candy, used the Sour Patch Kids characters in a series of Snapchat content targeting different events and holidays. The fun, simple approach was a perfect match for the fast pace of Snapchat, and it was reflected in the high amounts of impressions and engagements the campaign achieved.

Facebook Live

Over 2 billion people have watched Facebook Live, so needless to say, the audience is there. Facebook Live videos also get more engagement than conventional Facebook videos; however, as a lot of television personalities can tell you, managing a live production isn’t easy. 

One of the main things that you need to understand is that you want to strike a balance between coming off as relatable while maintaining a sense of polish. Plenty of planning should go into production before any live videos start, but you should still strive to capture that unedited, raw feeling that draws interest over other types of video content. People like the idea of getting a behind-the-scenes “real” look at your business. Equally important is rigorous testing of your video equipment and internet connection to make sure that all things work well when it’s time to go live.

As an added point, promotion matters. Unlike a typical video, you’re going to get most of your engagement in a small period, so you want to have a steady stream of reminders in your other marketing to get your audience prepped for the event.

How Are Companies Using Facebook Live? Sephora utilized the classic AMA (ask me anything) format with special guests to allow participants to ask questions about makeup and beauty. This is a perfect example of giving viewers value (the chance to interact with an industry figure) that they wouldn’t see in any other format. 

YouTube

For most companies, YouTube is the starting point with video marketing. This is a reasonable point, as between the popularity of the platform and the Google connection (for SEO purposes), there’s probably the most chance to strike marketing paydirt with a YouTube channel. The major drawback, though, is that the lane is a lot more crowded. Because of this, you need to take extra care when setting up a YouTube channel for marketing success. 

Perhaps the most important thing, which may sound funny enough, is making sure you have enough of a marketing base to really leverage a quality YouTube production. A lot of companies see the return video marketing provides and put the cart before the horse. This means a heavy investment in video content without a sales funnel or landing pages to really take advantage of the attention. Optimization also matters. Your tags, description, even thumbnail choice can impact your content showing up in searches. 

How Are Companies Using YouTube? Intel’s Meet The Makers campaign is a classic example of using video marketing to craft a narrative. Each video revolves around a person using Intel products to create new experiences and technology. This example shows how you can show micro (individual) effects of your product among greater macro trends, creating a brand story versus a conventional advertisement.

Vimeo

The difference between YouTube and Vimeo is largely a matter of audience. YouTube has a larger audience and more of a generalist focus. However, Vimeo has a far smaller but devoted audience, mainly coming from the creative realm. So, if your marketing audience generally has something to do with art, video editing, or similar niches, you may do better here. Just understand that the smaller audience means that you need to focus a lot more on engagement and interactions with the userbase to get traction.

How Are Companies Using Vimeo? For the most part, many marketing efforts on Vimeo are the same as on YouTube. It’s mainly the audience targeting that is the difference here.

TikTok

If you were to make a comparison to newcomer TikTok and other platforms, the since-retired Vine is probably the best Selfie Videoexample, largely based around short videos up to 15 seconds in length. Like Snapchat, the audience is entirely youth-based, so you want to be mindful of that. As of today, TikTok is in its infancy as a marketing channel, but it may be a good idea to see what some of the top influencers on the platform are doing. This may help with driving engagement to your own channel. 

How Are Companies Using TikTok? Chipotle’s clever use of dubbing songs with video of their product ended up launching a #Guac Challenge, which became the highest-performing branded challenge on the platform to date at the time. Less is more when you don’t have a lot of time to work with.

 

Video marketing is generally considered to be the crown jewel of a lot of different marketing strategies, but whatever platform you choose to use, the most important thing to remember is that quality matters. Putting together a half-hearted effort isn’t going to garner the results that you need, and considering the investment involved, that’s a major issue. 

The best way to see a return on your investment is by partnering with a veteran marketing agency like Glint Advertising. We supply consultation and resources to help your video content make a meaningful impression on your audience.

What is Social Media?

Social media is a growing part of what we do at Glint Advertising. As part of our Digital Media Department, we manage social posting and advertising for several of our clients. However, if you’re not familiar with the wide world of online social networking or just are not sure of the specifics, you may need a little elaboration. The online world is constantly changing, but for now, social media can be broken into two large umbrellas: Post-Based and Conversation-Based.

Post-Based social networks can be very conversational! However, the premise of the network revolves around a post. A few post-based social networks would include platforms such as Instagram, Pinterest, Vine, YouTube, and blogs. On Instagram, the user uploads a photo or short video, at which point other users can engage in conversation, debate, philosophy, and other what-have-yous. Similarly, on Youtube or Vine, a video is uploaded to the platform, and conversations occur in the comments. On Pinterest, an item from the web is “pinned,” or placed onto a digital pinboard. In a blog, the user would post their thoughts or ideas, and open them up for discussion. Not all blogs are conversation-enabled, however. If blogs are prone to receiving spam or abusive comments, the conversation element can often be disabled.

These platforms all involve a conversation occurring around a specific event that has happened because another user has uploaded something to the network. The conversations are often sparked by the post and facilitated by the uploader. These networks are very useful in generating “buzz” about something, primarily because the upload and the entire conversation can be shared in an email, a text message, to another social network, or even by word-of-mouth.

The second umbrella is Conversation-Based. A conversation-based network exists solely to have a conversation. These social outlets enable sharing of links from around the internet, photos, and videos, but the focus is on developing a relationship through conversation. Twitter is an excellent example of this. Users are able to easily engage each other without necessitating an introduction through a follow or friendship. This makes it easy for individuals to engage with other individuals or with companies and brands. Facebook and LinkedIn also facilitate conversations. The key premise of a conversation-based social network is to engage users in discussion with other users (including brands and companies).

Though each social network currently available has its own strengths, weaknesses, and focal points, they are all able to be placed into one of these wider umbrellas. By narrowing the types of networks to only two, we are able to understand how each one fits into an overall social and digital media strategy a little bit better.