Tag Archives: Snapchat

Marketing Director’s Guide to social video in 2020

Man taking promo videoIn statistical terms, many marketing experts see video marketing as their “holy grail.” Here are a few notable numbers about the medium:

  • 85% of all online users watch video content monthly on any of their given devices.
  • 54% of all consumers want to see more content out of the different brands/companies that they support.
  • Videos are the favorite type of content people want to see on social media.
  • 88% of all video marketers find themselves satisfied with the ROI their video marketing efforts provide.

If video seems so overly loved and preferred among audiences, why haven’t we reached a point of oversaturation? There are a few reasons for this; for one, a lot of the statistics we talk about refer to quality video content. Half-hearted forays into the format aren’t going to give you the results you want. Secondly, it’s important to realize that not all video content goes to the same place. There are a variety of different video social platforms out there, all of which have different pros, cons, and uses from a marketing perspective. Here’s a look at the major video social platforms out there and some of the existing video marketing strategies for each.

Snapchat

While Snapchat is one of the hottest video social platforms, it’s also one of the most unique, as the advent of similar functionalities for Instagram and now Twitter show. In essence, Snapchat is used for posting small images/videos known as “stories” that are deleted after 24 hours. In and of itself, this feature instantly separates Snapchat from the other options on the market. However, what should you know about finding success on this platform?

For one thing, as you probably already assumed, having your content get deleted after a day means that you need to be smart with how you prepare video content. Creating a longer video then cutting it into snap-friendly snippets will be a lot better use of your time than creating a bunch of smaller ones. You also want to be creative with your image editing to add your own brand flair to more generic images/videos. Demographics also matter. There’s no denying that Snapchat is the domain of millennials and younger generations. Trying to target Snapchat toward, say, a senior living facility is pretty much a waste of time and assets.

How Are Companies Using Snapchat? A great example of using Snapchat’s features and demographics to a marketing advantage is the Sour Patch Kids campaign in 2014. The brand, targeting teen fans of the candy, used the Sour Patch Kids characters in a series of Snapchat content targeting different events and holidays. The fun, simple approach was a perfect match for the fast pace of Snapchat, and it was reflected in the high amounts of impressions and engagements the campaign achieved.

Facebook Live

Over 2 billion people have watched Facebook Live, so needless to say, the audience is there. Facebook Live videos also get more engagement than conventional Facebook videos; however, as a lot of television personalities can tell you, managing a live production isn’t easy. 

One of the main things that you need to understand is that you want to strike a balance between coming off as relatable while maintaining a sense of polish. Plenty of planning should go into production before any live videos start, but you should still strive to capture that unedited, raw feeling that draws interest over other types of video content. People like the idea of getting a behind-the-scenes “real” look at your business. Equally important is rigorous testing of your video equipment and internet connection to make sure that all things work well when it’s time to go live.

As an added point, promotion matters. Unlike a typical video, you’re going to get most of your engagement in a small period, so you want to have a steady stream of reminders in your other marketing to get your audience prepped for the event.

How Are Companies Using Facebook Live? Sephora utilized the classic AMA (ask me anything) format with special guests to allow participants to ask questions about makeup and beauty. This is a perfect example of giving viewers value (the chance to interact with an industry figure) that they wouldn’t see in any other format. 

YouTube

For most companies, YouTube is the starting point with video marketing. This is a reasonable point, as between the popularity of the platform and the Google connection (for SEO purposes), there’s probably the most chance to strike marketing paydirt with a YouTube channel. The major drawback, though, is that the lane is a lot more crowded. Because of this, you need to take extra care when setting up a YouTube channel for marketing success. 

Perhaps the most important thing, which may sound funny enough, is making sure you have enough of a marketing base to really leverage a quality YouTube production. A lot of companies see the return video marketing provides and put the cart before the horse. This means a heavy investment in video content without a sales funnel or landing pages to really take advantage of the attention. Optimization also matters. Your tags, description, even thumbnail choice can impact your content showing up in searches. 

How Are Companies Using YouTube? Intel’s Meet The Makers campaign is a classic example of using video marketing to craft a narrative. Each video revolves around a person using Intel products to create new experiences and technology. This example shows how you can show micro (individual) effects of your product among greater macro trends, creating a brand story versus a conventional advertisement.

Vimeo

The difference between YouTube and Vimeo is largely a matter of audience. YouTube has a larger audience and more of a generalist focus. However, Vimeo has a far smaller but devoted audience, mainly coming from the creative realm. So, if your marketing audience generally has something to do with art, video editing, or similar niches, you may do better here. Just understand that the smaller audience means that you need to focus a lot more on engagement and interactions with the userbase to get traction.

How Are Companies Using Vimeo? For the most part, many marketing efforts on Vimeo are the same as on YouTube. It’s mainly the audience targeting that is the difference here.

TikTok

If you were to make a comparison to newcomer TikTok and other platforms, the since-retired Vine is probably the best Selfie Videoexample, largely based around short videos up to 15 seconds in length. Like Snapchat, the audience is entirely youth-based, so you want to be mindful of that. As of today, TikTok is in its infancy as a marketing channel, but it may be a good idea to see what some of the top influencers on the platform are doing. This may help with driving engagement to your own channel. 

How Are Companies Using TikTok? Chipotle’s clever use of dubbing songs with video of their product ended up launching a #Guac Challenge, which became the highest-performing branded challenge on the platform to date at the time. Less is more when you don’t have a lot of time to work with.

 

Video marketing is generally considered to be the crown jewel of a lot of different marketing strategies, but whatever platform you choose to use, the most important thing to remember is that quality matters. Putting together a half-hearted effort isn’t going to garner the results that you need, and considering the investment involved, that’s a major issue. 

The best way to see a return on your investment is by partnering with a veteran marketing agency like Glint Advertising. We supply consultation and resources to help your video content make a meaningful impression on your audience.

Snap Stock Is Out

Photo Credit: HowToStartABlogOnline.net 

Snapchat, Inc, just released their IPO and people are going crazy over Snap stock. If you haven’t heard of Snapchat by now, then there’s a good chance you’ve been living under a rock. Snapchat is today’s most popular social media application among millennial’s. The app focuses on disposal content that you can share with friends between 1-to-10 seconds, or upload content to your ‘story’ that will stay active for 24 hours. Snapchat was initially created with the sole purpose of exchanging nude photos of one another, and though the app is still infamously known for that, Snapchat offers a way to capture raw moments in life. Most of the moments individuals now share with each other are strange objects, unique scenery, and of course, food. A popular phrase has even been coined, “if you didn’t Snap it, did it really happen?”

But what makes Snapchat so popular? Snapchat encourages sharing personal moments with close friends, despite not physically being with them. Snapchat is widely popular with millennials and centennials due to their love of sharing moments and experiences. Now, combine that attribute with the ability to share 10-seconds worth of content, appealing to the short attention that humanity has developed, is a recipe for success. Snapchat has managed to take all the positive aspects of each big-name social media platform. Further, they’ve incorporated them all into one social media application – photos, videos, filters, emojis, artistic doodles, and text without it permanently being stuck on the web. However, there’s still the option of screenshotting a snap, so think twice before you send that risky photo. Researchers have also found that the way individuals interact accounts for Snapchats success among its users. Interactions are not ‘transactional’ like a text message, or as impersonal as a status update on Facebook and Twitter, but rather more ‘conversational,’ and it has the ability to place users in the exact moment an event occurred.

With all of these amazing features intertwined within Snapchat, some may wonder how does the social media app make money. Snapchat has found an interesting way to disguise ads between Snaps, and stories. Individuals are likely to see ads when they shuffle between stories. However, these ads are not your typical 30-to-60 seconds long. They are shorter, much shorter. They can range anywhere from 5-to-10 seconds long, and the best part is that they can be skipped by users. Contrary to many people’s belief, millennials are less likely to pay for an application than any other generation.

Another reason why Snapchat has become so popular over the years is due to its relevancy. Twitter has an endless stream of tweets, and users often move on to another application before they get a chance to read a tweet from someone they care about. Meanwhile, Facebook feeds are either filled with people that you don’t often consider close friends or click-bait. Click-bait is a coined phrase that describes an interesting title, but redirects to an uninteresting page when clicked. The unfortunate case of Twitter and Facebook is that users spend a lot of time trying to find that small sliver of content that is relevant and interesting to the user. Snapchat is much different. Yes, there is a lot of content on Snapchat that is waiting to be found, but Snapchat allows you to follow, view and receive content from the people you care about. Snapchat even has a section called Discover which is news-like content, and even that section can be editable. Users can select which publications, new stations and TV channels they want to view.

The last reason why Snapchat has become so popular, and probably the most important, the application is just downright fun to use. Users can attach goofy stickers, funky lenses that add a mask, manipulate the structure of your face or add geofilter sliders that indicate which city or location you are in while Snapping. Even the Discover aspect of Snapchat, which is probably the least interesting part, is still more engaging than Twitter Moments – a similar news like attribute.

Team members of Glint regularly use Snapchat, so we decided to conduct an internal survey:

What is it about Snapchat that you like the most?
“I love Snapchat because it allows me to capture raw moments of life. Anyone can record an event and add effects to make it look more appealing, but with Snapchat, the moment itself is appealing; not the effects added to it. It’s authentic and unfiltered. I love using Instagram, but every photo and video I come across looks like a glossy imitation of reality.”

What don’t you like about Snapchat?
“I do not like how you can screenshot users content. I have had friends screenshot embarrassing photos I have sent before, and it would be great if Snapchat could remove that feature. Hint, hint, Snapchat.”

What do you use Snapchat for?
“Initially, I used Snap to send photos and videos, but as Snapchat evolved, so has the way I use it. I now use Snapchat as my preferred method of communication. I use it to for text messages and phone calls. The best part is that the app allows me to add a personal touch to my message specifically tailored for whomever I’m sending a message to.”

Would you ever stop using Snapchat?
“The first step to recovery is acceptance, and I accept that I’m addicted to Snapchat, but I can only see myself stop on the off chance that my friends stop using it. There would be no reason for me use an application if my only form of interaction was viewing other people’s stories. I like sending and receiving content from friends.”

There’s no doubt that Snapchat will become a household name like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. It’s interesting to note that Facebook saw the potential of Snapchat just after a year of its creation. Facebook offered Snapchat $3 billion dollars to buy it out, but to many people’s surprise, Snapchat declined the offer. Facebook bought Instagram for $1 billion dollars in 2012, and Facebook has made Instagram the number one photo sharing application in the world. Facebook may have had a different plan for Snapchat, but no one is complaining about the potential fate of Snapchat under Facebook control. If you haven’t used Snapchat yet, we encourage you to experiment with your friends, and if we have one recommendation it would be this: if you’re not willing to risk that Snap being screenshotted then don’t send it.