Not a Coffee Fetching Copy Maker

Glint Intern Isaiah Bays

College cannot replace real-world experience. Don’t get me wrong, I wouldn’t be where I am today without my college classes and training. However, even my professors know school can’t genuinely prepare students for working in the industry, so they actively encourage students to seek out internships. They know getting the first-hand experience in the industry will teach students things that cannot be taught in a classroom. All of my professors who are working or have worked in the industry share their stories and experiences. However, getting second-hand experiences will never compare to actually working in the field. Getting to be a part of a business and seeing processes in action quickly synthesizes all of those college lessons and catapults your understanding to another level. There are many things I am lucky to be taking away from my internship at Glint Advertising that a classroom couldn’t have provided. Here’s how they made it happen.

Unlimited Access to Knowledge
I was able to ask every question that came to mind; nothing was off-limits. We all know it’s important to ask questions, and that’s not what this is about. This is more about picking the brains of people working in the industry and working alongside them while doing it. This makes it so much easier to put the puzzle pieces together because there’s much less explaining to do. It’s also easier to know what questions to ask when you are in the midst of a project with someone. You might think, “Yeah, I could just ask my professor the same question.” But, how would you know to ask the question without the experience prompting you to seek out the answers?

Exposure to Creative Expertise
I got to build upon my creative process. As a graphic designer, the single most important thing is being creative. I always hear student designers ask the question, “What’s your creative process?” The person answering the question tries their best to explain. But, because they’re only using their words, it’s never entirely clear. There isn’t a class called “Creative Processes.” Thus, students are pretty much left on their own to figure out if they have what it takes to be a designer. At Glint, I learned to make it in this industry, I need to work much faster. While in the classroom, you may have a month, and many tries to perfect a logo. In the real-world, you may only have a few days. Craig taught me his creative process. And instead of telling me, he took his time and showed me. His mentorship has made a lasting impact on my creative process that will be with me forever. Getting that first-hand experience is truly something special; something that couldn’t have been found in a classroom.

Character Critiques
I got critiques on my character that I can use to make myself better. The focus of formal education is mainly on hard skills, so a character critique is rarely something you see in a classroom. You might occasionally see someone getting called out in college because they are overly talkative, or the opposite; not engaged and contributing. But, that’s not exactly building character. Hearing about things you need to improve on as it relates to a business environment, rather than a classroom, gives invaluable insight that will help me in my career. Employees have a short window of time to address issues at a real job before they could be let go. Having the grace to make mistakes, then getting critiques to make corrections during an internship can improve your professionalism. This will ultimately make you more hirable for an actual job.

Connected with the Team
The Glint team truly understands what interns need on an individual level. They take the time to work with each intern on their projects and personal growth. Interns are there to learn and work, and Glint provides a good mix of give and take. There’s no busy work. They really make interns part of the team and challenge you with real projects to complete. It’s a wonderful chance for you to grow your career beyond the classroom, and I’m honored to have had this experience interning for Glint.

Looking for an internship? Give us a call at 817-616-0320 or drop us a note at agency@glintadv.com and learn what it takes.

Mesquite Convention and Visitors Bureau earns five state awards.

Mesquite, TX – September 4, 2019 – The Mesquite Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB) received five awards at the recent Texas Association of Convention and Visitors Bureau’s (TACVB) Annual Conference for excellence in destination marketing.

 

The Mesquite CVB received the People’s Choice Awards, selected by tourism industry peers, for its budget size in the categories of Advertising, Website, Mobile Site, and Video. “We had a record 116 entries this year,” said Kim Phillips, TACVB Chief Operating Officer. “The winners faced stiff competition, and these awards are well-deserved.”  

 

Glint Advertising created a new logo identifier and brand vision for the Mesquite CVB in late 2018. After the brand strategy was approved, the agency played an integral role in ensuring it was represented correctly across all new marketing assets. Also, Glint created an advertising campaign that targeted different audience segments within multiple media outlets that resulted in a second-place award for budgets under $350,000.

 

“Rolling out any brand slowly over time has its challenges. But not doing so would have hurt the Mesquite CVB tourism and revenues goals for the year, and that was not something we were going to get wrong,” said Craig Lloyd, Glint President/CEO. “We are honored the Mesquite CVB trusted us to help create and push their new brand forward.”

 

About the Mesquite CVB: The Mesquite CVB will continue to balance its award-winning marketing efforts with strong sales partnerships with local hotel properties as well as collaborative programs with restaurants, retail, and area attractions. Digital outreach and printed materials will contribute to a blend of promotional campaigns to sustain Mesquite’s relevancy as a destination of choice for conferences and day travelers. For more information, go to www.visitmesquitetx.com

 

About Glint Advertising: Founded in 2000 and located in the heart of the DFW Metroplex, Glint specializes in branding and integrated marketing campaigns. With a focus on strategy and collaboration, Glint provides its clients with branding, advertising, and marketing solutions that are tracked and measured, and brand-focused for superior ROI. For more information, visit www.glintadv.com

 

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Intern Insights, Jamie Mendoza

Jamie Mendoza Red Telephone BoothAs a college student, it is imperative to have internships under your belt before applying for a job. I’ve heard the horror stories. The ones that depict the intern as just a cog in a machine, going on coffee runs and doing miscellaneous tasks like filing papers. So when Glint Advertising called and offered me an internship, I had no idea what I was in for. I did know I wanted to learn everything I possibly could during my time there, which I did. What I didn’t expect was to learn who I am as a person and how I would fit into this industry.

The Glint team is brilliant in the way that they take every challenge as an opportunity, and are just as eager to learn as their interns. The passion they put into their clients’ work is the same they demonstrate towards teaching. My experience in this industry was microscopic, and they took that in stride. I quickly found what you learn in a classroom that barely scratches the surface of what it’s actually like at an agency. Here are some important tips I’ve learned about how to navigate the business world.

An hour of creativity can go a long way for a client but is only a minor piece of the puzzle.
Going above and beyond is what puts you ahead, but there are so many factors you must take into consideration if you want to be successful.

Have a reason to show up to work every day.
Everyone’s reason will vary, but passion is contagious and can make a significant difference for your job and your clients.

Always be confident in your ideas and what you’re presenting.
Confident people own the choices they make and accept the outcomes that come with them. Removing self-doubt will not only ensure your own trust but will allow your clients to believe in you as well.

Don’t be afraid of talking about money.
As awkward as the topic may be, it’s the universal component that makes the world go round for all parties. Getting that conversation going during the initial meeting will save you many difficult conversations later on.

Always ask questions, even if you’re scared of the answer.
Learning something new about yourself or your work, even if that something is negative, means you have the will to correct it. So ask all those hard questions, because a good leader is never scared of an opportunity to learn.

Be thankful.
This industry is very competitive, so being hired as an intern or an employee is an incredible opportunity. Be grateful for every challenge, triumph, defeat, and victory, because someone believed in you enough to give you this chance. Don’t let it go to waste.

Along with these tips, I’ve also learned a great deal about myself and what I can accomplish. I now appreciate constructive criticism and can learn from my mistakes. I can consult and take suggestions from my coworkers, but also make confident decisions based on my own knowledge of the topic. I learned you must sometimes fail to succeed, and that’s okay. On top of it all, I created strong professional relationships with the Glint team and will continue to seek their guidance for as long as I can.

My summer with Glint has allowed me to grow personally and gain new knowledge of the advertising industry. Although I already had passion for this career, this internship cultivated a new perspective for me and the things I can achieve as a business professional. Like a sixth-grader on the playground, Glint opened my eyes toward opportunities that I could capitalize on. I’ll spare you the comparison of the monkey bars to social media strategy, as they are both as fun as they are challenging. Even though I’m sad my time as a Glint intern is coming to an end, I’m eager to see where my career will take me.

Looking for an internship? Give us a call at 817-616-0320 or drop us a note at agency@glintadv.com and learn what it takes.

The Real Cost of “Low-Cost” Marketing

Low-Cost Marketing HeaderSome entrepreneurs believe that low-cost marketing efforts are enough to lead a company to their goals. While this might be possible for a very small percentage of all companies out there, it is far more likely that low-cost marketing will have the business falling short. This article helps explain why companies should be investing more time and money into their marketing efforts to avoid the hidden cost of low-cost marketing.

What Is Low-Cost Marketing?
Low-cost marketing is a relatively simple term that is defined by any form of marketing efforts that come at a relatively low cost. Some of the more common examples of low-cost marketing include social media advertisements, free product samples, website forums, and more. Many of these tactics are extremely valuable, but not when used in the setting of low-cost marketing.

Lack of Marketing Planning
Many different problems are associated with low-cost marketing. One of the biggest is that inexpensive marketing tends to lack any long-term vision. Since developing an in-depth marketing plan involves spending many hours and more than a thousand dollars on ideas and developments, most companies tend to avoid it when they are looking for low-cost marketing options.

Therefore, using these low-cost marketing tactics means companies are generally operating on a tactic basis rather than following a strategic plan. It is essentially bringing a “flying by the seat of your pants” attitude to running a business, which is never a good idea. After all, failing to plan your business ventures essentially equates to planning to fail.

Inability to Be Consistent
If you are going to be one thing, then it is best to be consistent. Consistency is especially true when it comes to operating a business. When customers and clients look at any part of a business’s operation, whether it is their website, social media pages, public advertisements or some other form of publicity, then they expect to see a certain standard of material. This type and standard will vary greatly depending on the specifics of the company. However, the company must be able to stick to their carefully crafted image no matter what they are doing.

The more people who are involved in the marketing efforts, the harder this is to do. This is because different individuals can have opposing opinions on how to best communicate strategies or ideas. If they are not working in unison and following a well-developed marketing plan, then it can be easy for approaches to become mixed up.

Inconsistent approaches often result in a random jumble of different voices being produced by the company. Not only will this come off as looking unprofessional and generally annoying, but it will also have real-world consequences by reducing the number of possible sales a company could get.

Less Progress Over More Time
When it comes to operating a business, an emphasis on long-term growth is essential. Since the majority of businesses fail within the first five years of operation, companies must be aware of where every single dollar is being spent so their operations can be sustainable over the long term.

Many companies make the mistake of thinking the answer is using low-cost marketing that will end up saving them money on their marketing efforts. However, what they fail to understand is that low-cost marketing has a very narrow window in which it is useful. If a company is hoping to be in operation for longer than a few months, then they are going to need something much more developed and hefty than anything low-cost marketing can offer.

Since low-cost marketing is spending significantly less money on a company’s marketing efforts, it is inherently going to produce fewer results. Fewer results are not typically something any company is looking for, especially one that is just getting started or is only a couple of years old looking for significant growth within their customer base.

The basic strategies of low-cost marketing mean it will result in a slow burn in how it improves a business’ customer base. If a company is only spending $1,000 every couple of months on simple tasks like Facebook marketing and is only seeing marginal results from it, then they are not going to get an outstanding ROI.

Solutions to Low-Cost Marketing
There is a reason why so many people say that you need to spend money to make money. In the world of business, this could not be more true, especially when it comes to marketing efforts. After all, if the company is not able to get their name out into the public and make customers know they even exist, then no one is going to be aware of their products or services, let alone purchase them. So if a company is going to cut corners anywhere, marketing is the last area in which they should do so.

Taking the time to develop a comprehensive marketing plan is crucial for the long-term development of any company. Marketing Plan CoverThese marketing plans often have sections dedicated to setting milestones for the 6-month mark, 1-year mark, 5-year mark, and 10-year mark, with occasional milestones thrown in between those points. A marketing plan might not seem like an important part of the process, but it is vital to help ensure a company stays on track.

When marketing efforts are attempted without any vision of a common goal, then it is far too easy for the messages and efforts of the marketing to become lost and far less useful. Having one person or one team handle the vast majority of marketing efforts for a company can help to ensure all of the content stays on brand and delivers the best results possible.

Spending more money upfront on marketing efforts will also ensure faster results for the company. Instead of having to wait six months or even a year to see any significant rise in a company’s customer base, they could see their numbers more than double in only three to four months of work by spending $7,000 to $10,000 a month.

To get a team of professionals to help you fulfill the best marketing strategy possible, contact our team at Glint Advertising today. We deliver the content that you need to get the results that you want.

Establishing a Company Voice

Speak Your Company VoiceThere are about 1.7 billion websites on the internet. That is about 1.7 billion businesses that are constantly talking online. However, only about 200 million of those websites are active and many of them are saying the same thing in the same way. That’s why it is so important that companies establish a unique voice and utilize every resource that they can to shout it from the rooftops.

One of the best resources for companies to gain an advantage over the competition is the use of a company voice. This is a term that seems to get thrown around a lot, yet many companies do not fully understand what it means, how to identify one, or how to build their own.

More Than Just Words
A company voice obviously involves the words that are said, but it is so much more than that. The tone of what is said is arguably just as important as the words themselves. Although the words are what delivers the message, the tone is what is used to establish intent and set a company apart from its competitors.

In fact, it was first established by Albert Mehrabian in 1967 that the words that are being said are actually a significantly small portion of communication. He proposed that the act of communication was comprised of three distinct parts: the words being spoken, the tone of the words, and the body language accompanying it. In his system, the words spoken accounted for only 7 percent of meaning, while tone accounted for 30 percent, and the remaining 55 percent was body language.

While this is not a perfect comparison for business today, considering the internet did not exist in 1967, it is still a relatively accurate model of communication. Taking this model into account, trying to base a company voice strictly off of words is not going to get you anywhere. It takes so much more than that, which is why so many companies fail to develop a signature voice.

Identifying a Company Voice
There are many professionals who are likely reading this right now and thinking that it does not apply to them. That might be entirely true, but there is a better chance that your company does not have the voice that you think it does. Here is a great test to figure out whether your company has its own distinct voice or not.

If you go on to your website or social media accounts and cover up the logo of the page and posts, you should be able to show these to someone familiar with the company, and they should immediately be able to tell what company these belong to based on the voice of the content. If they struggle to figure it out or are not able to identify it at all, then there is a good chance that your company is lacking the voice that you thought it had.

Almost just as bad as not having a company voice is having multiple, often conflicting, company voices. This can occur when the company voice is being portrayed by various employees and takes on their own voice rather than the overall company’s. For example, if the tone of the content that can be found on the company website dramatically varies from the tone of content that can be found on its social pages, there is a good chance that the company voice is really just the voices of various employees. This will once again make it hard for people to identify your company based on the voice of the content since there will be no consistency throughout the company’s various online channels.

Finding Yourself
There is a common cliche that you have to learn to love yourself before you can learn to let others love you. Well, a similar thing can be said for the world of business and finding a company voice. There is no way that a company can share a voice with the public if they do not first sit down amongst themselves, and figure out exactly what their voice is.

This process starts with an internal reflection of what makes your company unique and embracing that fact to establish a company voice. This goes far beyond how your company’s products are different from your competitor’s products. It should include things like what is different about the office culture that you have created at your company, how your employees are unique, and how your business practices set you apart. All of these things are part of who your company is and should, therefore, be an integral part of your company’s voice.

When completing this evaluation of your company, it is important to come away with things that are not cliche. After all, this is not someone interviewing for a job, it is a company attempting to establish its unique voice. So it is wise to try and stay away from typical descriptors such as honest, dependable, cutting edge, and revolutionary. Ironically, using these words is anything but cutting edge, since a large portion of businesses will integrate this as part of their voice.

Once your company has completed this exercise and has come away with several important indicators of what makes you unique, it is essential that you write these down and keep them handy for future use. After all, in most companies, the communications will be handled by a designated communications worker, which is likely to see some turnover throughout the years.

As new employees or multiple employees become tasked with handling certain sections of corporate communication, they need to have the tools necessary to be able to display a consistent voice across all platforms. So by having a physical, or rather digital, copy of this voice style guide, these employees can work to make sure that what they are writing up falls in line with the company voice.

Shout It From the RooftopsShare Your Company Voice Everywhere
Once a company has a concrete idea of what they want their voice to be, it is time to start shouting it from the rooftops so that the public can be introduced to their new voice. Companies should then begin including this voice in everything — the about page on their website, product descriptions, email subscription confirmation messages, voicemail greetings, face to face communication, and more.

Nothing is too small to fall in line with the company voice, since anything that does not match up with this established voice can be confusing to customers. If you need help establishing your voice and aligning it with your brand, Glint is here to help. For more information, email us at agency@glintadv.com or give us a call at 817-616-0320.