All posts by glintadv

The In and Out of Advertising

Door handleWhy people love it, and why they leave it. The advertising industry encompasses a multitude of specialized businesses, including public relations, marketing companies, media services, and advertising agencies. Although the industry is multi-faceted, its components have the common goal of persuading consumers, or their target audience, to purchase or support a product or service. Convincing the right way is where advertising agencies take the spotlight, and they play a crucial role in finding new and innovative ways to reach potential customers.

With the ever-changing demands of markets, there is no shortage of creative work coming out of the industry. Perhaps this fast-paced, dynamic environment is what sparks many to idolize advertising as a fun and exciting career.

Individuals often set their aspirations for a career in advertising based on television sensationalism and early praises of “you’re so creative.” In the end, many feel disillusioned when they realize the sacrifices that come with it and end up leaving without looking back. So, the question is: is advertising really for you? Let’s weigh the pros and cons: 

The Excitement of the Industry
It all starts with a love for writing and design—the brilliant copy, the captivating images, and how the two can mold together perfectly in ads to capture an audience. When this love fuels a passion that’s strong enough, it causes individuals to seek a career in advertising. In addition to the glitz and glamour of advertising, there are many additional aspects to love within the industry—which is what leads people to join in the first place. While the benefits below, among others, may hit all the checkmarks for aspiring advertisers, some will find their passion isn’t worth the sacrifices that are required to be successful. 

1. Admiration For The Efforts Made By Advertisers
People are often enamored by how an ingenious idea was brought to life by advertisers. There is also a strong admiration for the efforts and meticulous planning that had to be made to ensure all aspects of an advertising campaign met the client’s needs. 

2. A Creative Outlet
Many problem-solvers with creative minds are itching to get their creative juices flowing, especially when they have many ideas and nowhere to apply them. Working in a fast-paced industry that values creativity provides daily opportunities to bring those ideas to life. They’re able to craft the perfect solution for clients, and, in turn, satisfy that creative itch they’ve always had.

3. The Ultimate Satisfaction
It’s hard to develop a campaign that not only checks all the boxes of a client brief but also resonates strongly with the target consumer. However, when you do see this happen, the amount of satisfaction and pure bliss that comes from knowing you contributed to something this successful makes it very worthwhile.

4. Constantly Evolving, Always Learning
The market is always shifting, and the consumer’s needs and wants can change in the blink of an eye. Shifts like this make it hard to keep up, but this also always opportunities to learn about all sorts of processes and pick up new skills. 

5. The Variety of Work
The variety of work in advertising is infinite. Each campaign is a clean slate. The bottom line is the topics are endless, and creatives can have fun with re-entertaining ideas that may not have been a good fit for other campaigns.

6. Networking Opportunities
Due to its collaborative nature, there are many opportunities to network with people from all sectors of industry. The relationships you establish and nurture can help you land new opportunities, give you a competitive edge, and often, be instrumental to your success in the industry.

7. A Unique Lifestyle
Flextime, cool office spaces, long lunches, stylish dress codes, fancy cars, awards, industry reputation, bars in the office, directing commercials, are all realistic and great attributes of the industry. We sit around all day brainstorming and coming up with ideas on how to solve marketing challenges for clients. We don’t make widgets; we are literally paid to think, strategize, and be creative.

The Challenges of the Industry
Even though the advertising can be rewarding, the industry does demand a lot of commitment, and the pressure of deadlines can be overwhelming. It’s also a business that requires thick skin because your ideas are not always met with enthusiasm from clients. You’re not making “art,” you’re solving challenges for companies that drive the right opportunities to their front door. Advertising is a business that has to make money, which means you can’t spend months on end developing ideas for one campaign. Time is money, and if you can’t produce quickly, consistently, and with high quality, you won’t be in the industry for long.

1. Ethical Boundaries Undefined
Remember, the main goal of advertising is to convert the target audience to customers. In order to do so, you’ll be contributing to advertisements that may misrepresent the product to the consumers by only focusing on the best features and ignoring negative features. You’ll also have to make decisions to push things forward based on budgets and delivery schedules rather than the highest quality of work. Moral dilemmas such as these can be challenging for many people. 

2. Not Always a “Creative” Industry
There will be cases where you’re encouraged to be creative, but as Leon Jacobs, Executive Creative Director of Boondoggle says, only to the extent of what the client wants. In other words, your creative freedom is limited by the box that the client puts you in before even starting the brainstorming process. There’s really no way around it, as the client’s needs come first in this industry.

3. Not Always “Fun”
One of the best features of advertising is that there are lots of opportunities to work on many different projects and topics. Some will be new, some you may love to work on, and some may conflict with your beliefs. Unfortunately, even if the topic isn’t something you’re thrilled with, if that’s a client the agency believes in, you’ll have to set your beliefs aside and work with them.

4. Have to be Aggressive
With so many other creatives aspiring to succeed in advertising, you can bet that they will come strong with their ideas to win the pitch. Being shy and timid does not get you far in this industry, so you must learn to have thick skin and pitch all your ideas with absolute confidence. You will also have to learn not to take it personally if one of your ideas gets rejected. It’s a feast and famine business that flows like the tide in the ocean. Also, with many agencies, when low tide hits and you lose a large client, you may lose your job.

5. Low Compensation at First
Individuals entering the advertising industry should be prepared for a small paycheck, at least for the first year or so. There is a significant wage gap between entry-level positions of advertising agencies versus tech companies, and some, understandably, find that a turn off. The reason for this is, “you don’t know what you don’t know.” As much as you’ve learned in school, entering the field of advertising for the first time is like starting school all over again.

6. High Pressure
Clients can be demanding and impatient, and as a result, many projects become very stressful. On top of having short deadlines, last-minute changes close to deadline are also inevitable. The worst part is you may end up taking the heat if a campaign flops and a client pulls out. With all this pressure, it can be hard to come up with great ideas even if you are naturally creative. Since this is a business, creative on demand is expected at times and all though important; it is a very small piece of the big picture.

7. Long Hours and Weekends
Again, with the short deadlines and demanding nature of the job, you may never feel like you have enough time. A lot of people end up having to work long hours and over the weekends in order to finish everything they have scheduled. The office becomes the place you spend the most time, and your social life may become non-existent. Although this doesn’t happen all the time, it will happen, and you usually find out last minute.

Leaving the Industry
Wooden Artistic FigureEven after assessing the good and the bad, some people still choose to stay with the industry, as the advertising lifestyle can be intoxicating. With that said, even seasoned advertisers may end up leaving the industry for good.

Kate Robertson, the co-founder of One Young World and former Chairman and Global President of the Havas Group, believes that the advertising industry is a “young person’s game.” With the high stress, long hours, and constant need to come up with fresh ideas, after many years the work can take a toll on the body. 

Other times, people leave out of no fault of the industry, but a shift in priorities. They once entered the advertising industry with a fiery passion and ambition to climb the ranks, but now want to settle down and spend more time with their family. With that said, no one can definitively say if advertising is “good” or “bad,” but rather, it ultimately depends on whether it suits you or not.

To all our seasoned agency colleagues, thanks for keeping the love of our industry alive. We’re here because our passion never wavered, and it’s provided us with experiences that have made us extremely good at our craft. When you see a passion for creativity in our youth, encourage them to pursue our industry, but also illuminate them on what it really takes to live the dream. 

Why Brand Personality Matters

Brand Personality SocksEvery brand, whether big or small, has the opportunity to create a brand personality. A companies personality is much different from the personality of the CEO or people who work for the company. It is a tone of character and values that allows consumers to connect more strongly with the brand. 

Establishing and maintaining a brand personality can deliver many significant benefits. Here are a few of the main reasons why every company should put thought and effort into developing and maintaining its unique brand personality. 

It Helps to Form Emotional Attachments In Consumers
When it comes to shopping for any product, the deciding factor, for most people, is emotions – whether they know it or not. Many people might think that the qualities and reviews of the product would be the most important aspect of the purchasing process. However, studies have shown that as much as 95% of all purchasing decisions are decided through subconscious aspects. That means there are feelings that even the consumer themselves are not aware of that have an overwhelming influence on which products they buy and which ones they do not. 

A big part of helping to form emotional attachments is injecting specific values and beliefs into the brand personality. Since a human personality requires certain morals and beliefs to flush it out fully, a brand personality requires the same thing. However, it is not quite the same thing. Companies, especially large ones, are often seen as being more of an idea than an actual person. Therefore, they must be careful about how they express their opinions on sensitive topics. Thus, the values that a brand has are usually much more general, such as valuing family, low prices, and excellent customer service. 

Repeatedly reinforcing these values establishes the brand’s personality. These values will have a massive impact on how consumers view the company. After all, 64% of all consumers form relationships with specific brands due to having shared values with one another. Once this emotional attachment is created, it becomes much easier for a business to connect with its customer base. 

It Allows Brands to Stand Out In a Crowd
One of the biggest challenges facing businesses today is trying to stand out from their competitors. With so many companies emerging in recent years that offer similar lines of products and services, it can be challenging to devise ways of distinguishing themselves from one another.

For example, one shoe company could develop a brand personality centered around being casual and carefree, which may appeal to younger consumers. A similar shoe company may develop a personality of elegant fashion, which will appeal to a completely different set of consumers. Contrasting approaches, such as these, results in far less direct competition and can help each company find success much easier. 

Contrasting personalities become extremely important when there’s a vast number of companies promoting similar types of products or services. When this happens, the businesses that set themselves apart with their personality will help themselves stand out.

Standing out with personality will help consumers take notice of the brand and be aware of it, and ultimately help create sales with their products. In today’s world of consumerism, name recognition is truly half the battle, with 89% of marketers reporting brand awareness as their biggest goal.

It Allows Brands to Portray Their Marketing Message Easily
Every company should have a specific message that they are Paper Cutoutscontinually portraying to their consumers. These messages usually consist of the unique benefits of their products or the type of consumer that they want using their products. For example, Crayola has a consistent message that their products are meant to fulfill childhood wonderment and that they value family togetherness over everything else. 

Having this consistent marketing message is important since it takes five to seven impressions before a consumer develops any brand awareness. By having a consistent brand personality and a unique marketing message, you can more easily connect with new consumers. Constant repetition and exposure with both marketing materials, as well as the general brand personality, will be twice as effective at making people aware of a brand’s existence and values. 

How to Pick the Perfect Brand Personality
There are many different types of personalities that brands can adopt. Which one they choose depends entirely on their leadership. However, this mustn’t be a decision that is made lightly since a brand personality is incredibly hard to change once it has been established. 

One of the most significant determinants that should affect the type of personality that a brand goes for is the type of product that they are offering. For example, a company that sells high-end and expensive jewelry should probably not have a casual and laid back personality. There are roughly five personality categories that brands tend to fall in.

The first one is a personality of kindness and trustworthiness. By having this type of brand personality, a company can portray an aura of sincerity, which is something that many people find appealing. Moreover, 94% of all consumers are more likely to develop a close relationship with a brand if they feel they are transparent and honest.

The next category of brand personality is one of excitement that involves feelings of youthfulness and being carefree. The third type is more of a rugged character, which commonly reflects athletic and outdoorsy traits. Some brands can also choose to have a confident personality, which promotes a feeling of success, leadership, and being influential. The final type of brand personality is one of sophistication and desirability. Brands achieve this by involving elegance, exclusivity, and high prices into their personality. 

A big part of developing and promoting a brand personality comes from the types of advertising that a company creates. To get help building the best advertisements for your business, contact Glint Advertising today at agency@glintadv.com or call 817-616-0320. 

Not a Coffee Fetching Copy Maker

Glint Intern Isaiah Bays

College cannot replace real-world experience. Don’t get me wrong, I wouldn’t be where I am today without my college classes and training. However, even my professors know school can’t genuinely prepare students for working in the industry, so they actively encourage students to seek out internships. They know getting the first-hand experience in the industry will teach students things that cannot be taught in a classroom. All of my professors who are working or have worked in the industry share their stories and experiences. However, getting second-hand experiences will never compare to actually working in the field. Getting to be a part of a business and seeing processes in action quickly synthesizes all of those college lessons and catapults your understanding to another level. There are many things I am lucky to be taking away from my internship at Glint Advertising that a classroom couldn’t have provided. Here’s how they made it happen.

Unlimited Access to Knowledge
I was able to ask every question that came to mind; nothing was off-limits. We all know it’s important to ask questions, and that’s not what this is about. This is more about picking the brains of people working in the industry and working alongside them while doing it. This makes it so much easier to put the puzzle pieces together because there’s much less explaining to do. It’s also easier to know what questions to ask when you are in the midst of a project with someone. You might think, “Yeah, I could just ask my professor the same question.” But, how would you know to ask the question without the experience prompting you to seek out the answers?

Exposure to Creative Expertise
I got to build upon my creative process. As a graphic designer, the single most important thing is being creative. I always hear student designers ask the question, “What’s your creative process?” The person answering the question tries their best to explain. But, because they’re only using their words, it’s never entirely clear. There isn’t a class called “Creative Processes.” Thus, students are pretty much left on their own to figure out if they have what it takes to be a designer. At Glint, I learned to make it in this industry, I need to work much faster. While in the classroom, you may have a month, and many tries to perfect a logo. In the real-world, you may only have a few days. Craig taught me his creative process. And instead of telling me, he took his time and showed me. His mentorship has made a lasting impact on my creative process that will be with me forever. Getting that first-hand experience is truly something special; something that couldn’t have been found in a classroom.

Character Critiques
I got critiques on my character that I can use to make myself better. The focus of formal education is mainly on hard skills, so a character critique is rarely something you see in a classroom. You might occasionally see someone getting called out in college because they are overly talkative, or the opposite; not engaged and contributing. But, that’s not exactly building character. Hearing about things you need to improve on as it relates to a business environment, rather than a classroom, gives invaluable insight that will help me in my career. Employees have a short window of time to address issues at a real job before they could be let go. Having the grace to make mistakes, then getting critiques to make corrections during an internship can improve your professionalism. This will ultimately make you more hirable for an actual job.

Connected with the Team
The Glint team truly understands what interns need on an individual level. They take the time to work with each intern on their projects and personal growth. Interns are there to learn and work, and Glint provides a good mix of give and take. There’s no busy work. They really make interns part of the team and challenge you with real projects to complete. It’s a wonderful chance for you to grow your career beyond the classroom, and I’m honored to have had this experience interning for Glint.

Looking for an internship? Give us a call at 817-616-0320 or drop us a note at agency@glintadv.com and learn what it takes.

Mesquite Convention and Visitors Bureau earns five state awards.

Mesquite, TX – September 4, 2019 – The Mesquite Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB) received five awards at the recent Texas Association of Convention and Visitors Bureau’s (TACVB) Annual Conference for excellence in destination marketing.

 

The Mesquite CVB received the People’s Choice Awards, selected by tourism industry peers, for its budget size in the categories of Advertising, Website, Mobile Site, and Video. “We had a record 116 entries this year,” said Kim Phillips, TACVB Chief Operating Officer. “The winners faced stiff competition, and these awards are well-deserved.”  

 

Glint Advertising created a new logo identifier and brand vision for the Mesquite CVB in late 2018. After the brand strategy was approved, the agency played an integral role in ensuring it was represented correctly across all new marketing assets. Also, Glint created an advertising campaign that targeted different audience segments within multiple media outlets that resulted in a second-place award for budgets under $350,000.

 

“Rolling out any brand slowly over time has its challenges. But not doing so would have hurt the Mesquite CVB tourism and revenues goals for the year, and that was not something we were going to get wrong,” said Craig Lloyd, Glint President/CEO. “We are honored the Mesquite CVB trusted us to help create and push their new brand forward.”

 

About the Mesquite CVB: The Mesquite CVB will continue to balance its award-winning marketing efforts with strong sales partnerships with local hotel properties as well as collaborative programs with restaurants, retail, and area attractions. Digital outreach and printed materials will contribute to a blend of promotional campaigns to sustain Mesquite’s relevancy as a destination of choice for conferences and day travelers. For more information, go to www.visitmesquitetx.com

 

About Glint Advertising: Founded in 2000 and located in the heart of the DFW Metroplex, Glint specializes in branding and integrated marketing campaigns. With a focus on strategy and collaboration, Glint provides its clients with branding, advertising, and marketing solutions that are tracked and measured, and brand-focused for superior ROI. For more information, visit www.glintadv.com

 

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Intern Insights, Jamie Mendoza

Jamie Mendoza Red Telephone BoothAs a college student, it is imperative to have internships under your belt before applying for a job. I’ve heard the horror stories. The ones that depict the intern as just a cog in a machine, going on coffee runs and doing miscellaneous tasks like filing papers. So when Glint Advertising called and offered me an internship, I had no idea what I was in for. I did know I wanted to learn everything I possibly could during my time there, which I did. What I didn’t expect was to learn who I am as a person and how I would fit into this industry.

The Glint team is brilliant in the way that they take every challenge as an opportunity, and are just as eager to learn as their interns. The passion they put into their clients’ work is the same they demonstrate towards teaching. My experience in this industry was microscopic, and they took that in stride. I quickly found what you learn in a classroom that barely scratches the surface of what it’s actually like at an agency. Here are some important tips I’ve learned about how to navigate the business world.

An hour of creativity can go a long way for a client but is only a minor piece of the puzzle.
Going above and beyond is what puts you ahead, but there are so many factors you must take into consideration if you want to be successful.

Have a reason to show up to work every day.
Everyone’s reason will vary, but passion is contagious and can make a significant difference for your job and your clients.

Always be confident in your ideas and what you’re presenting.
Confident people own the choices they make and accept the outcomes that come with them. Removing self-doubt will not only ensure your own trust but will allow your clients to believe in you as well.

Don’t be afraid of talking about money.
As awkward as the topic may be, it’s the universal component that makes the world go round for all parties. Getting that conversation going during the initial meeting will save you many difficult conversations later on.

Always ask questions, even if you’re scared of the answer.
Learning something new about yourself or your work, even if that something is negative, means you have the will to correct it. So ask all those hard questions, because a good leader is never scared of an opportunity to learn.

Be thankful.
This industry is very competitive, so being hired as an intern or an employee is an incredible opportunity. Be grateful for every challenge, triumph, defeat, and victory, because someone believed in you enough to give you this chance. Don’t let it go to waste.

Along with these tips, I’ve also learned a great deal about myself and what I can accomplish. I now appreciate constructive criticism and can learn from my mistakes. I can consult and take suggestions from my coworkers, but also make confident decisions based on my own knowledge of the topic. I learned you must sometimes fail to succeed, and that’s okay. On top of it all, I created strong professional relationships with the Glint team and will continue to seek their guidance for as long as I can.

My summer with Glint has allowed me to grow personally and gain new knowledge of the advertising industry. Although I already had passion for this career, this internship cultivated a new perspective for me and the things I can achieve as a business professional. Like a sixth-grader on the playground, Glint opened my eyes toward opportunities that I could capitalize on. I’ll spare you the comparison of the monkey bars to social media strategy, as they are both as fun as they are challenging. Even though I’m sad my time as a Glint intern is coming to an end, I’m eager to see where my career will take me.

Looking for an internship? Give us a call at 817-616-0320 or drop us a note at agency@glintadv.com and learn what it takes.